A carpet is a textile floor covering typically consisting of an upper layer of pile attached to a backing. The pile was traditionally made from wool, but since the 20th century, synthetic fibres such as polypropylene, nylon or polyester are often used, as these fibres are less expensive than wool. The pile usually consists of twisted tufts that are typically heat-treated to maintain their structure. The term carpet is often used in a similar context to the term rug, but rugs are typically considered to be smaller than a room and not attached to the floor.

Carpets are used for a variety of purposes, including insulating a person’s feet from a cold tile or concrete floor, making a room more comfortable as a place to sit on the floor (e.g., when playing with children or as a prayer rug), reducing sound from walking (particularly in apartment buildings), and adding decoration or colour to a room. Carpets can be made in any colour by using differently dyed fibres. Carpets can have many different types of patterns and motifs used to decorate the surface. Carpets are used in industrial and commercial establishments such as retail stores and hotels and in private homes. Today, a huge range of carpets and rugs are available at many prices and quality levels, ranging from inexpensive, synthetic carpets that are mass-produced in factories and used in commercial buildings to costly hand-knotted wool rugs that are used in private homes of wealthy families.

Carpets can be produced on a loom quite similar to woven fabric, made using needle felts, knotted by hand (in oriental rugs), made with their pile injected into a backing material (called tufting), flatwoven, made by hooking wool or cotton through the meshes of a sturdy fabric, or embroidered. Carpet is commonly made in widths of 12 feet (3.7 m) and 15 feet (4.6 m) in the US and 4 m (13 ft) and 5 m (16 ft) in Europe. Since the 19th and 20th century, where necessary for wall-to-wall carpet, different widths of carpet can be seamed together with a seaming iron and seam tape (formerly it was sewn together) and fixed to a floor over a cushioned underlay (pad) using nails, tack strips (known in the UK as gripper rods), adhesives, or occasionally decorative metal stair rods. Wall-to-wall carpet is distinguished from rugs or mats, which are loose-laid floor coverings, as wall-to-wall carpet is fixed to the floor and covers a much larger area.

CONSTRUCTION
Believe it or not, most modern-day rugs are made with the same techniques used by master weavers for hundreds of years. The finest hand-woven rugs still require a considerable time and attention to detail. And while machine-made rugs can be made more quickly, the same basic techniques remain in place.
In most cases, the quality and price or your rug will be determined by the construction time and the talent of the weaver. But don’t forget to consider texture and appearance when shopping. To help narrow your options, take a look at the unique features of these common rug types.

What is a handmade carpet?

A Floor Covering which is made completely by human hands by Handknotting, Handtufting or Handweaving, in which handspun Yarn of natural fibres (most commonly wool or silk) is used, with individual character and design & Hand-made carpets are traditionally more expensive than those made by machines. Though there are several carpet-making methods, including braiding, hand-tying (or hand-knotting), hooking, shearing and tufting, the most common of these are braiding and hand-knotting.

Quality Grading Systems

India uses their own unique system for grading rug quality by knot count. Handmade rugs from any country (except China) are often graded by Knots Per Square Inch, or KPSI – an important measure of a hand-knotted rug & quality, value and even durability. A rug with a higher knot count will typically possess the attributes of greater intricacy and clarity of design and is usually more expensive than a rug with a lower knot count, but with similar design features etc.

Follow on